Best Mountain Bike Water Bottle Cages 2020 – Top 10 Ranked Reviews

If you plan to ride any great distance from your home, then you’ll probably need to take some water with you. You’re most likely to take your water, or other liquid, in a standard 16 oz or 24 oz bottle. Consequently, you’ll need a water bottle cage to hold it whilst you’re riding.

Nearly all mountain bikes will have a couple of spaces for bottle cages. The two hex bolt mounts for each space are universal, so you don’t need to worry about the cage being the wrong size.

But, the best mountain bike water bottle cages can vary significantly in terms of materials and design…

Though they all primarily serve the same purpose, there are plenty of differences between them. Our top 10 list features some of the most popular designs and covers a range of budgets.

So, let’s dive in and take a closer look…

mountain bike water bottle cages reviews

Top 10 Best Mountain Bike Water Bottle Cages 2020 Reviews


1 UShake Water Bottle Cages

This is a very traditional and popular style of water bottle cage. You can see them on bikes everywhere today. However, they were just as likely to be seen on vintage bikes going back into the 70s and beyond.

Strong and weatherproof…

The UShake water bottle cage is made from an aluminum alloy, so it’s both durable and weatherproof. The company also claims it’s lightweight at just 61 g. We’re sorry guys, but we’re going to have to disagree on this one.

This might have been lightweight 30 or 40 years ago, but now there are plenty of best mountain bike water bottle cages coming in at half this weight and lower. If you want a genuinely low-weight water bottle cage, look at something in carbon fiber.

Careful…

The bottle cage will hold larger bottles up to 26oz of size. However, in our experience, on rougher terrain, you might run into problems. This is because the bottle cage only grips the bottle about a third the way from the bottom.

If you have a full 26oz bottle of water and take your bike over very bumpy ground, the chances are you’ll lose it. We’d recommend you stick with 16oz bottles only and make sure you bend the cage inwards to exert maximum pressure on the bottle.

The fact is, smaller bottles over slightly challenging terrain will generally be fine.

UShake Water Bottle Cages
Our rating:4.6 out of 5 stars (4.6 / 5)

Pros

  • Strong
  • Inexpensive.
  • Retro cool looks.
  • Durable.

Cons

  • Low level of grip on larger bottles.
  • Weight.

2 Ibera Bicycle Lightweight Aluminum Water Bottle Cage

This is a much more contemporary design. You’re likely to see this kind of water bottle cage on a variety of different bikes, including cruisers, hybrids, road bikes, and mountain bikes. This is a design favored by amateurs and professionals alike.

Heat-treated aluminum…

The bottle cage is made from heat-treated aluminum and weighs in at around 42 g. The weight is beginning to touch on lightweight. For such a well-made bottle cage, made from aluminum, it’s a respectable weight.

There’s no doubt that this is a good design whilst riding the rough stuff…

The shaped tab at the top of the water bottle angles in much more than on the Ushake bottle cage we just reviewed. This tab serves the purpose of keeping the bottle from jumping out of the cage.

It does the job very effectively, which is why you can secure larger bottles in the cage over rougher terrains. Furthermore, the ovalized shape does a good job of putting strong pressure on and around your bottle to prevent it from rattling and moving around.

Smooth operation…

We also like it because it’s easy to glide in your bottle into the cage and take it out by feel alone. The side grips make it all a breeze. We’re sure you’ll agree, it’s great to be able to quickly put back the bottle without having to take your eyes off the trail ahead.

Ibera is a decent company that makes some decent products. You get a guarantee with the bottle cage, but frankly, you’re unlikely ever to need it. The bottle cage should be more than strong enough to stand the tests of time.

Ibera Bicycle Lightweight Aluminum Water Bottle Cage
Our rating:4.6 out of 5 stars (4.6 / 5)

Pros

  • Tight grip on the bottle.
  • Well angled tab at top.
  • Easy to slide bottles in and out.
  • Manufacturer’s warranty.

Cons

  • Color choice.

3 Bike Water Bottle Holder

This is made from CNC machined aluminum. It’s strong and durable and weighs in at 48 g. It has a similar design to the Ibera ovalized bottle cage; however, one of the main differences is that the two bottle arms are slightly more angular.

Great grip…

The result of the more angular flaps, or sides, is that more pressure is exerted directly onto your bottle. This means it’s held in place more tightly, and there’s less chance of it falling out. On the downside, it takes a little bit more effort and force to seat it properly in the first instance.

Another downside of the design is that it tends to quickly wear away the plastic on the side of the bottle. Since a lot of bottles are now quite expensive, it’s a consideration. If you’re lucky enough to have been tossed a bottle from a pro on tour, you’re unlikely to want it to get it messed up.

Great quality build…

The water bottle cage is powder coated and is available in either black or white. The quality of the finish is high, which is very welcome. Frankly, a lot of bottle cages have poor paint jobs and finishes. If you’ve just spent hundreds, or even thousands, of dollars on a new bike, there’s no doubt that having a scruffy bottle cage can drag it down.

No such issue with this bottle cage.

Bike Water Bottle Holder
Our rating:4.7 out of 5 stars (4.7 / 5)

Pros

  • Tight grip.
  • Quality made.
  • Durable.
  • Powder-coated paint job.

Cons

  • The force required to properly seat the bottle.

4 Wiel Full Carbon Fiber Bicycle Bike Light Drink Water Bottle Cage Holder

This is another pervasive design you see on a lot of mountain bikes as well as on a lot of road bikes.

It works in the same way as the Ibera bottle cage and can produce a tight grip from the two flaps to secure a tight hold on your bottle. What’s more, it can also safely hold larger bottles even on bumpy or loose trails.

But, placing your bottle into the cage is easier…

It slides in and out and can be done without even looking. The carbon fiber has plenty of spring in it and moves back into shape when not in use, without ever deforming.

One of the big pluses for this bottle cage is the weight. Weighing just 29 g, it’s one of the best mountain bike water bottle cages if you’re looking to shave a few extra grams from your bike’s overall weight. If you want to go a little more extreme, you could always swap out the bolts for titanium ones.

That will save you an extra couple of grams…

The Wiel Full Carbon Fiber is well finished and is every bit as good looking as it is expensive. It’s predominantly finished in black carbon with red and white decals. Unfortunately, it only comes in the one-color variant, which is a bit of a shame.

But…

There are plenty of us that have bikes with paint schemes that will clash terribly with these colors. And that’s important. As well made, light and practical as this water bottle cage is, a lot of mountain bikers are likely to look elsewhere just because of the color.

Oh, dear!

Wiel Full Carbon Fiber Bicycle Bike Light Drink Water Bottle Cage Holder
Our rating:4.7 out of 5 stars (4.7 / 5)

Pros

  • It’s super light.
  • Strong grip.
  • Good finish.
  • Easy to place bottle in and take out.

Cons

  • Expensive.
  • Only available in one color.

5 Schwinn Bike Waterbottle Holder

We like Schwinn as a company. They have brought so much to cycling over the years and continue to bring new as well as old tried and tested products to market. Regardless, they nearly always have a quality product to sell.

So, what about their water bottle cage?

Well, firstly, this falls under the category of one of their tried and tested products. This kind of bottle cage has been around forever and is not noticeably different from the Ushake water bottle we reviewed earlier.

The truth is that it’s the same shape and design, it’s the same weight, at around 60 g, plus it’s also made from the same aluminum material. As it turns out, it, unfortunately, has some of the same design flaws too.

Big bottles beware…

If you take a closer look at the photo, with the large bottle in place, you can clearly see that the bottle cage can only grip less than half of the 24oz bottle. On bumpy roads, and with a full bottle, there’s a good chance the bottle will come out.

One of the reasons for this failure is because of the age of the design. It was originally made in the years when bottles were smaller. They were typically around 12oz to 16oz. These sizes of bottles sit much more securely in the cage. Consequently, on rougher rides, it might be advisable to stick with smaller bottles.

On smooth roads, you should be OK…

Schwinn also provides a bottle with the cage. Normally we would applaud this, but quite honestly, the bottle is not great. The plastic is too thick, not a common complaint we know, which makes it close to impossible to squeeze. You need to squeeze the bottle to take in large quantities at one go. Instead, you have to suck on the bottle. For a cyclist, this is useless.

We’re not sipping tea at a garden party for goodness sake…

Also, the dust cap is a complete waste of time and utterly impractical for mountain bikers. No one on a bike has time to fiddle around, pulling and pushing on a cap after every drink. Take it off and throw it in the garbage. Preferably throw the bottle in there with it.

So, what’s the verdict?

Not a particularly great effort by Schwinn. The cage works OK with smaller bottles and looks great too, but the bottle is poor. From Schwinn, we honestly expect better.

Schwinn Bike Waterbottle Holder
Our rating:4.4 out of 5 stars (4.4 / 5)

Pros

  • Stylish.
  • Strong.
  • Durable.
  • Good for small bottles.

Cons

  • Not great for larger bottles.
  • Weight.
  • The bottle provided is garbage.

6 Blackburn Outpost Cargo Water Bottle Cage

This is hardcore.

The Blackburn Outpost Cargo Water Bottle Cage is for the type of mountain biker who’s going off the beaten track or riding on some seriously rough terrain. The one thing we can guarantee is that any water bottle you take with you will still be in situ when you arrive. With the straps secured, the bottle cage puts a vice-like grip on your bottle.

Incredible strength…

The water bottle cage is made from 6mm alloy tubes and has two thick straps to keep your bottle in place. The alloy tubes give incredible strength. The straps also allow you to keep all different odd shapes and sizes of bottles in the cage.

Once your bottle is secured, it’s no easy feat to get it out of the cage. You’ll probably have to stop your bike to get to it. But this bottle cage isn’t about the speed of access, it’s all about rock-solid reliability. It’s also not about weight either as the bottle with straps weights a hefty 164 g.

But the truth is none of this really matters…

The cool thing is that The Blackburn Outpost Cargo Water Bottle Cage can be used to carry cargo as well as water bottles. It’s big and strong enough to bring something like a small tent or sleeping bag. However, if you do decide to use it to carry water, you’ll be able to fit a bottle of just about any size, and safely carry up to 4.4kgs of weight.

That’s potentially a lot of accessories…

In the real world, this means you can carry around 4 liters of water on the one cage and mount. If you’re riding a mountain with multiple mounting points, you’ll be able to carry a considerable amount of water and accessories.

Blackburn Outpost Cargo Water Bottle Cage
Our rating:4.2 out of 5 stars (4.2 / 5)

Pros

  • Can be used with odd-shaped bottles.
  • Can be used to carry accessories.
  • Solid grip.
  • 4.4kg Carrying capacity.
  • Very strong tubular construction.

Cons

  • No quick access to the bottle.

7 Ibera Bicycle Extra Lightweight Alloy Fusion Water Bottle Cage

This is predominantly based on a modern design though it does have a couple of surprises up its sleeve.

Firstly, let’s talk about weight…

31 g is light. Before exploring the specifications in more detail, you’d be excused for thinking it was made from carbon fiber. We certainly did, and we were wrong.

The Ibera Bicycle Extra Lightweight bottle cage is made from extra-lightweight aluminum alloy. It’s commendable to build a bottle cage that can compete on weight with something made from carbon fiber. However, the construction does have one potential flaw, which leads us to our next point.

It’s bendy like Beckham bro…

Unlike carbon fiber, aluminum is more pliable and can be easily bent out of shape. The design of the bottle cage is, therefore, more suitable for plastic and carbon fiber. This is because the design relies on the material trying to return to its original shape when a bottle is inserted, thus gripping the bottle in place.

The flaw with very thin lightweight aluminum is that it can potentially become permanently bent out of shape and consequently lose its gripping power. To overcome this, Ibera has connected the two flaps with a stretchable rubber grip that allows you to insert a bottle, including larger 24oz bottles, without exerting enough force to bend the aluminum out of shape.

Genius…

The bottom line is that it keeps a powerful hold on all sized bottles even on more challenging rides. But best of all, it does this, weighing just 31 g and costing significantly less than a carbon water bottle cage equivalent.

Ibera Bicycle Extra Lightweight Alloy Fusion Water Bottle Cage
Our rating:4.3 out of 5 stars (4.3 / 5)

Pros

  • Weight.
  • Fits all sized bike bottles.
  • Strong grip.
  • Cost.

Cons

  • Poor color choice.

8 Bushwhacker Shasta Black

This is a more relaxed style of bike water bottle cage.

If you like to keep your water bottle directly in view, this could be for you. Once mounted, it sits right by your handlebars, so you do not need to look down or feel around to grab a drink on the move.

Simple design…

The bottle cage is made from 600 denier polyester and secures onto your bike using a loop and velcro strap. It’s a similar system that’s used to attach small-sized saddlebags onto a saddle rail or seat post. There is one loop, and that fits around the top of the handlebar stem and a second that fits on the downtube of the handlebar stem.

This is an insulated and lightweight cage, which is a couple of big pluses in its favor…

It’s designed for a bike with straight bars. It’s not something you’d use on a road bike or gravel bike. Once it’s fixed, it’s nice and secure. However, one of the downsides of this style is that you’ll have to ensure you have enough stem showing to attach the strap on the downtube section.

Another small flaw is that the bottle cage will move around a little when you’re on the move. Also, it’s not as easy to put the bottle back into the cage as with all solid designs. You can feel the bottle back into most bottle cages, but you have to be more precise with your placement with this one.

For safety…

You’ll probably have to stop to use the Bushwhacker Shasta Black – Insulated Bike Water Bottle Holder. However, since it’s probably going to find its way onto a bike associated with a relaxed riding style, it’s unlikely to be an issue.

A lot is made of the fact that no tools are needed to fix it to your bike. But quite frankly, if you’re not able to attach a conventional bottle cage, which uses just two hex bolts, you’ve no business owning a bike in the first place.

Bushwhacker Shasta Black
Our rating:4.4 out of 5 stars (4.4 / 5)

Pros

  • Lightweight.
  • Fits all standard bike bottles.
  • Insulated.
  • Inexpensive.

Cons

  • Difficult to place the bottle back in the cage.
  • May not fit onto the downtube of short stems.

9 Anjoy Ultra Light Full Carbon Fiber

Here’s another lightweight option.

But this time made from carbon fiber…

The design has two flaps that put plenty of pressure to grip your bottles. You can put any size bottle in, and they’ll stay put. You’d have to go over some seriously rough stuff to dislodge your bottle.

The bottle cage makes it easy to slide your bottle in and out. You can do this all by feel. We think the best mountain bike water bottle water cages should all have this feature. Having to take your eyes off the track or trail for even a split second is not a great idea.

Besides, it’s gorgeous…

We’re going to give the Anjoy Ultra Light Full Carbon Fiber water bottle cage 10 out of 10 for looks. We love the black carbon fiber matt finish. There are no decals or added color. This is all very minimalist.

Because it’s so simple, it will go with just about any color scheme. Plus, we’re sure you’ll agree that this kind of look is very much in keeping with a mountain bike. The reality is that high gloss finishes with strong colors tend to limit the appeal of any accessory depending on the color of your bike’s paintwork.

Not the price we would expect for carbon fiber…

A final positive for this bottle cage is that it’s relatively inexpensive for one that’s made out of carbon fiber. Plus, if you need to get a pair, Anjoy will knock off a couple of dollars and sweeten the deal yet further. Not bad at all.

Anjoy Ultra Light Full Carbon Fiber
Our rating:5 out of 5 stars (5 / 5)

Pros

  • Lightweight.
  • Strong.
  • Easy to put in and take out the bottle.
  • Good value.

Cons

  • Minimalist style that’s not everyone’s taste.

10 FiveBox Lightweight Aluminum Alloy

This looks familiar.

It looks familiar probably because it’s close to identical to the Ushake and Schwinn bottle cages we reviewed earlier. Design-wise it, therefore, has exactly the same characteristics and flaws.

Let’s very briefly review those again…

The first thing is that because it made out of aluminum, this is no lightweight. If you’re a weight weenie, please look away now. We don’t want to cause any distress. It weighs 100 g.

The classic design works reasonably well for smaller bottles. This kind of bottle cage was first introduced during a time in history when apparently we weren’t all quite as thirsty. These days if people don’t have a large cup of coffee, giant soda, or massive water bottle in their hands, at all times, they might die.

We know all of this for a fact…

Because the TV and internet keep telling us to hydrate or our skin will drop off, and we will collapse and need hospital care. The consequence is enormous 24oz bike water bottles and larger.

Unfortunately, these larger sizes of bottles are hopeless at staying in these cages over the bumpy stuff. On flat smooth surfaces, OK. Smaller bottles over semi-rough trails are also mostly OK.

But…

Other than it being heavy and not having the most reliable grip on larger bottles, it has the advantage of looking cool and also being inexpensive. Anjoy has also broken out the spray can and given it a bit of a stealthy matt black finish. Undoubtedly better than the shiny black finish on the Schwinn bottle cage.

FiveBox Lightweight Aluminum Alloy
Our rating:4.5 out of 5 stars (4.5 / 5)

Pros

  • Durable.
  • Inexpensive.
  • Cool looks.
  • Good matt black finish.

Cons

  • It weighs a ton.
  • Useless for larger bottles.

Best Mountain Bike Water Bottle Cages Buying Guide

Materials

The most common materials for bottle cages are plastic, aluminum alloy, and carbon fiber. The cheapest of these materials is plastic. We haven’t featured a plastic water bottle cage because, despite their affordable price, they are less durable, heavier, and don’t perform as well as their alloy and carbon fiber counterparts.

Also, they tend to look a little naff…

An exception to these materials was the nylon bottle cage made by Bushwhacker. It has its place and is undoubtedly lightweight, but it’s probably not the best material for a mountain bike bottle cage.

Weight

To an extent, the kind of material will dictate the weight. Carbon fiber will usually weigh the least. Typically, a bottle cage made from carbon fiber will weigh around 30 g. There are carbon water bottle cages weighing half of this. However, they are a little flimsy and are better suited to road bikes.

mountain bike water bottle cage

Which is why they’re not featured here…

The Ibera Bicycle Extra Lightweight Alloy Fusion Water Bottle Cage receives an honorable mention for achieving 30 g with its rather ingenious design. Impressive. Well done, guys and girls.

The Blackburn Outpost Cargo Water Bottle Cage was the outlier of the bunch. Tipping the scales at 164 g, it’s a bit of a beast. However, it can carry water bottles and other accessories up to a weight of 4.4kgs. That’s about the same as a newborn baby.

We wonder if you could strap one of those to the cage!

Grip Strength

Leaving the Blackburn Outpost Cargo Water Bottle Cage out of the equation, since it has straps and is a very different kind of animal, the newer styles of bottle cages afford higher levels of grip. This means on rough terrain, which is what mountain bikes are all about, you have much less chance of your bottle going for its own little walk.

The reason for this grip strength is that the flaps of the cage wrap around the majority of the bottle’s circumference and also at a higher point on the bottle.

This is in contrast to the bottle cages made by Ushake, Schwinn, and Fivebox…

This rather quaint and old design only grips the bottle at the front and the rear and also not very high up the length of the bottle. This causes problems for taller, larger water bottles. Frankly, large bottles and these three water bottle cages don’t go well together. Just stick with 12oz and 16oz bottles, and you’ll be fine.

Ease of Access

Modern designs of bottle cages win here as well.

mountain bike water bottle cages

Sliding a water bottle into a cage that opens up and then closes around it, including on the sides, is easy. By contrast having to guide a bottle into a cage with open sides, without looking, can be a bit hit and miss. It can also lead to the water bottle being seated at an angle and, therefore, not being correctly in position.

That’s a couple of easy wins for the new boys in town…

Appearance

When it comes down to appearance, we love the old style of water bottle cages. They do, however, have to go with the right kind of mountain bike. A new carbon mountain bike with an alloy water bottle cage that looks like it came out of the 60s looks wrong.

It’s very much a case of horses for courses…

Where we think all the companies need to take note is concerning the color. If you choose to use prominent colors and logos on the bottle cage, it puts it in danger of clashing with the paintwork on your bike.

If a company is still going to use prominent colors, they should be prepared to offer plenty of colorways. But, if not, then they should go for minimalist plain styling and color choices as can be found on the Schwinn, Anjoy, or Fivebox bottle cages.

Before We Conclude

For other mountain bike accessory reviews, head over to the Best Mountain Bike Saddles, the Best Mountain Bike Gloves, the Best Cycling Shoes, the Best Bike Mirrors, the Best Bike Lights, the Best Bike Helmet Lights, the Best Bike Computers, the Best Bike Racks, the Best Bike Repair Stands, and the Best Saddle Bags for Cyclists.

Then for a touch of fun, we recommend checking out the Best Electric Bike Conversion Kits.

OK, back to water bottle cages…

Final Thoughts on The Best Mountain Bike Water Bottle Cages

So, there you have it, a good selection of mountain bike water bottle cages currently on sale. There are water bottle cages to cover most kinds of mountain bike needs and budgets. Hopefully, there’s one in there that is suitable for you.

Out of the 10 we reviewed, we felt that there was one bottle cage that stood out. We felt it offered just about everything we needed in a mountain bike bottle cage. The… Anjoy Ultra Light Full Carbon Fiber Bicycle Bike Water Bottle Cage

… is, therefore, our top pick.

This is a very lightweight bottle cage that’s strong and also exerts a powerful grip on any standard sized bike water bottle. We like how easy it is to seat the bottle, and we also like its neutral carbon fiber matt finish. But best of all we love the fact that this is a very inexpensive carbon made bottle cage.

Enjoy your rides, and enjoy your bikes.

We will be happy to hear your thoughts

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